Four Tines & a Napkin

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(via How did Kit Kat become king of candy in Japan? – Eatocracy - CNN.com Blogs)
Excerpt:Yet for big Western brands, Japan is a particularly hard nut to crack. Given the unique nature of the Japanese market and home-field advantage, the top five brands for all packaged food products in Japan are domestic.
“Japanese consumers are the most demanding in the world not only in terms of the quality of product but also quality of packaging and visual presentation,” says Atsushi Morisawa, general manager for Mars Japan.
But among the hundreds of special editions and new products that are launched each spring and autumn, one old favorite from the West has managed to be big in Japan: Kit Kat.
But how did the chocolate wafer bar go from its humble origins in northern England in the 1930s to a perennial favorite among Japan’s faddy eaters? The answer has something to do with persistent investment from Nestle and a lot to do with great big dollop of luck.
To Nestlé’s amazing good fortune, the word Kit Kat sounds similar to the Japanese phrase “Kitto Katsu”, which roughly translates to mean “surely win.” It’s a term of good luck often used by students before their exams, but to Nestle it has sounded more like “Ka-ching!” 

(via How did Kit Kat become king of candy in Japan? – Eatocracy - CNN.com Blogs)

Excerpt:
Yet for big Western brands, Japan is a particularly hard nut to crack. Given the unique nature of the Japanese market and home-field advantage, the top five brands for all packaged food products in Japan are domestic.

“Japanese consumers are the most demanding in the world not only in terms of the quality of product but also quality of packaging and visual presentation,” says Atsushi Morisawa, general manager for Mars Japan.

But among the hundreds of special editions and new products that are launched each spring and autumn, one old favorite from the West has managed to be big in Japan: Kit Kat.

But how did the chocolate wafer bar go from its humble origins in northern England in the 1930s to a perennial favorite among Japan’s faddy eaters? The answer has something to do with persistent investment from Nestle and a lot to do with great big dollop of luck.

To Nestlé’s amazing good fortune, the word Kit Kat sounds similar to the Japanese phrase “Kitto Katsu”, which roughly translates to mean “surely win.” It’s a term of good luck often used by students before their exams, but to Nestle it has sounded more like “Ka-ching!” 

Filed under Japan Kit Kat chocolate kitto katsu confections articles CNN